Michael Williams

The Trains Now Departed is tops on Amazon – with all 5* reviews. And with lovely display in my local bookshops


June 11, 2015 Blog
Delighted to see that The Trains Now Departed is still ranked tops in its category on Amazon – with all five-star reviews. And it’s got a lovely display in our local bookshops in north London. Here’s the Primrose Hill Bookshop (alongside my fellow local and and former colleague Andrew Marr)
TTND Primrose Hill books

http://amzn.to/1xKrjzz

http://bit.ly/1r1FrBy

http://www.primrosehillbooks.com

What Amazon says:
5.0 out of 5 stars Nostalgia with a slightly different twist 26 May 2015
By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I’ve read and reviewed plenty of books about lost lines, sometimes focusing on their days in active service, sometimes looking at their subsequent usage as footpaths, cycle ways or whatever, or their derelict remains. I’ve also read and reviewed books about lost railway architecture and former named express trains. This book covers all of those aspects to some extent, but also other things, at least some of which have been covered elsewhere.Here, there is a chapter on dining cars – a relatively recent loss, although the author notes that some train operators, particularly First Great Western, still operate them. To be honest, I rarely used them in any form – standard or Pullman, though I do remember travelling on the Blue Pullman for some part of the journey between Paddington and Bristol. I can’t remember if I travelled alone or with a family member, or whether we used the Blue Pullman for both outward and return journeys, but I definitely used the service.

Another chapter is devoted to British seaside holidays. The peak for the railways was in the fifties, after which traffic gradually switcched to the roads until the onset of package airline traffic, which killed the traditional British seaside holidays. This chapter discusses Blackpool in particular but other places too.

Experimental and one-off locomotives also get a chapter. I’ve read about most of these elsewhere, but not the massively unsuccessful Leader class. I’d heard of it, but not read anything that stuck in the mind.

Ghost trains (more accurately called parliamentary trains) also get a chapter. The author selected the service from Leeds to Goole via Pontefract, a route now served by buses.

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 15 May 2015
By Edmund
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Bought for my rail enthusiast husband who is delighted and says it is ‘Brilliant’

Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 10 Jun. 2015
By simmo
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
excellent read

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Delighted to see that my new book, The Trains Now Departed, is still tops in Amazon, with all Five Star reviews. And lovely display in local bookshops. Pictured above is the window display of Primrose Hill Books this morning.

5.0 out of 5 stars Nostalgia with a slightly different twist 26 May 2015
By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I’ve read and reviewed plenty of books about lost lines, sometimes focusing on their days in active service, sometimes looking at their subsequent usage as footpaths, cycle ways or whatever, or their derelict remains. I’ve also read and reviewed books about lost railway architecture and former named express trains. This book covers all of those aspects to some extent, but also other things, at least some of which have been covered elsewhere.Here, there is a chapter on dining cars – a relatively recent loss, although the author notes that some train operators, particularly First Great Western, still operate them. To be honest, I rarely used them in any form – standard or Pullman, though I do remember travelling on the Blue Pullman for some part of the journey between Paddington and Bristol. I can’t remember if I travelled alone or with a family member, or whether we used the Blue Pullman for both outward and return journeys, but I definitely used the service.

Another chapter is devoted to British seaside holidays. The peak for the railways was in the fifties, after which traffic gradually switcched to the roads until the onset of package airline traffic, which killed the traditional British seaside holidays. This chapter discusses Blackpool in particular but other places too.

Experimental and one-off locomotives also get a chapter. I’ve read about most of these elsewhere, but not the massively unsuccessful Leader class. I’d heard of it, but not read anything that stuck in the mind.

Ghost trains (more accurately called parliamentary trains) also get a chapter. The author selected the service from Leeds to Goole via Pontefract, a route now served by buses.

Read more ›

Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 15 May 2015
By Edmund
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Bought for my rail enthusiast husband who is delighted and says it is ‘Brilliant’
 5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 10 Jun. 2015
By simmo
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
excellent read

June 11, 2015 Blog

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